sometimes

rovrsi:

'Beyond Bronze'. Kiara Kabukuru by Herb Ritts for Vogue US, june 1997.

rovrsi:

'Beyond Bronze'. Kiara Kabukuru by Herb Ritts for Vogue US, june 1997.

(via sugahwaatah)

The term “tear gas” is a misnomer. For one thing, “tear gas” seems to imply something innocuous— you would think it’s just a chemical that makes you tear up. In fact, tear gas is a dangerous, potentially lethal chemical agent which is outlawed under the Chemical Weapons Convention for use during wartime. As the Omega Research Foundation argues: “Less-lethal weapons are presented as more acceptable alternatives to guns. But these weapons augment rather than replace the more lethal weapons. Euphemistic labels are used to create the impression that these weapons represent soft and gentle forms of control. CS is never referred to by the authorities as vomit gas, in spite of its capacity to cause violent retching.” NGO Physicians for Human Rights believes that “ ‘tear gas’ is a misnomer for a group of poisonous gases which, far from being innocuous, have serious acute and longer-term adverse effects on the health of significant numbers of those exposed.”

What is tear gas? Facing Tear Gas (via funeral)

(Source: roundedcomms, via afro-dominicano)

my-tardis-sense-is-tingling:

These tweets (and one retweet) are from my friend Ryan, a journalist who has been on the ground in Ferguson for the past few days. (His Twitter account is here, and it’s a great source of updates on the situation there   [x]).

I just wanted to remind everybody that while spreading word about Michael Brown’s unjust murder and the horrifying events of the night of August 14, 2014, please do not oversimplify or ignore the complexities of the situation.

Some journalists in the town have been doing what journalists do: focusing on all the negative aspects about the community to try and make it look like a hell-hole in order to sell their own pictures and stories, and basically all many of them want to do is further their own careers. But focusing on all that negativity only paints the picture of one side of the story, ignoring a lot of other important things going on there.

Please do not fall prey to the media’s game. Anger at the actions of the police in Ferguson is totally justified, but in the midst of that we cannot allow the people who are living with the situation every day to be dehumanized. Despite all this tragedy and chaos going on around them, they’re still a community and in many ways they’re pulling through all of it together. They want peace. Anyone looting or burning things down is a very small portion of the community. The whole story is so much bigger.

A story doesn’t need tear gas to be interesting. We need to hear every side of this story, not just the horrific parts.

TL:DR: please don’t fall prey to media attempts to dehumanize and oversimplify the situation in ferguson!!

(via loveyourchaos)

witchsistah:

thisiseverydayracism:

What white St. Louis thinks about Ferguson
By Julia Ioffe | New Republic

About a 15-minute drive from the Ferguson protest that, by now, feels more like a block party, in the more upscale St. Louis suburb of Olivette, there’s a new strip mall with a barbecue joint and a Starbucks and an e-cigarette store. On a mild Thursday evening in August, people sat around tables, sipping coffee, sipping beer, dabbing barbecue sauce off their fingers.
All of these people were white.
It was a stark contrast to Ferguson, which is two-thirds black. Olivette is almost the exact opposite, at over 60 percent white. St. Louis, and the little hamlets that ring it, is one of the most segregated cities in America, and it shows.
Here in Olivette, the people I spoke to showed little sympathy for Michael Brown, or the protesters.
"It’s bullshit," said one woman, who declined to give her name. When I asked her to clarify what, specifically, was bullshit, she said, "All of it. I don’t even know what they’re fighting for."
"It’s just a lot of misplaced anger," said one teenage boy, echoing his parents. He wasn’t sure where the anger should be, just that there should be no anger at all, and definitely no stealing.
"Our opinion," said the talkative one in a group of six women in their sixties sitting outside the Starbucks, "is the media should just stay out of it because they’re riling themselves up even more."
"The protesters like seeing themselves on TV," her friend added.
"It’s just a small group of people making trouble," said another.
"The kid wasn’t really innocent," chimed in a woman at the other end of the table (they all declined to give their names). "He was struggling with the cop, and he’s got a rap sheet already, so he’s not that innocent." (While the first point is in dispute, the second isn’t: The police have said that Michael Brown had no criminal record.)
If anything, the people here were disdainful and, mostly, scared—of the protesters, and, implicitly, of black people.
"I don’t think it’s about justice for Michael Brown’s family," said the teenage boy. "It’s just an excuse for people to do whatever they want to do."
One man I talked to, a stay-at-home dad who is a landlord to three black tenants and one white one in Ferguson (“my black tenants would never do that,” he clarified) was more sympathetic to Brown and also had the sense that the police had overdone it a bit. But he was scared of the protests. I told him that the protest that day was entirely peaceful, festive almost. “You know,” he said. “I have a wife and three children, and if something were to happen to me, that would be very bad.”
As for the protests, well, they weren’t about justice; they were just an excuse. “People are just taking the opportunity to satisfy their desire for junk,” said one woman, knowingly. As if black people, the lust for theft encoded in their DNA, are just barely kept in line by authority.
"When they kill each other, we never hear about it," one of the Starbucks women said. This, she meant, was a good thing. "When it’s black-on-black violence, we never hear about it."
I asked why she thought that was.
"Because, basically, they hate whites!" her friend chimed in. "Prejudice, reverse prejudice. Prejudice goes both ways."
The others signalled their agreement.
"It’s not Ferguson people. It’s a lot of outside people coming in."
This was a sore subject with several of the people I spoke to. A major problem with the protests—and they very clearly did not mean the militarized police response to the protests—was that they were tarnishing St. Louis’s image as a nice place.
"I’m embarrassed to say I’m from St. Louis," the "bullshit" woman grumbled.
"Me, too," said her friend. "I don’t tell people I’m from St. Louis anymore."
"This is not representative of St. Louis," said one of the older women, back at Starbucks. "St. Louis is a good place. And Ferguson is a very good place."
"We have never had anything like this in St. Louis!" her friend exclaimed, flustered, as if trying to clear the city’s good name. "Ever!"
As the women grew uncomfortable, one of them hit on a way to fight back.
"Where are you from?" she asked me.
"Washington," I said.
"Well," she said, satisfied. "You people have trouble too sometimes."
And they all laughed.

Source: http://www.newrepublic.com/article/119102/what-white-st-louis-thinks-about-ferguson

And White St. Louisans wanna be mad when folks think they’re racist shit stains.

witchsistah:

thisiseverydayracism:

What white St. Louis thinks about Ferguson

By Julia Ioffe | New Republic

About a 15-minute drive from the Ferguson protest that, by now, feels more like a block party, in the more upscale St. Louis suburb of Olivette, there’s a new strip mall with a barbecue joint and a Starbucks and an e-cigarette store. On a mild Thursday evening in August, people sat around tables, sipping coffee, sipping beer, dabbing barbecue sauce off their fingers.

All of these people were white.

It was a stark contrast to Ferguson, which is two-thirds black. Olivette is almost the exact opposite, at over 60 percent white. St. Louis, and the little hamlets that ring it, is one of the most segregated cities in America, and it shows.

Here in Olivette, the people I spoke to showed little sympathy for Michael Brown, or the protesters.

"It’s bullshit," said one woman, who declined to give her name. When I asked her to clarify what, specifically, was bullshit, she said, "All of it. I don’t even know what they’re fighting for."

"It’s just a lot of misplaced anger," said one teenage boy, echoing his parents. He wasn’t sure where the anger should be, just that there should be no anger at all, and definitely no stealing.

"Our opinion," said the talkative one in a group of six women in their sixties sitting outside the Starbucks, "is the media should just stay out of it because they’re riling themselves up even more."

"The protesters like seeing themselves on TV," her friend added.

"It’s just a small group of people making trouble," said another.

"The kid wasn’t really innocent," chimed in a woman at the other end of the table (they all declined to give their names). "He was struggling with the cop, and he’s got a rap sheet already, so he’s not that innocent." (While the first point is in dispute, the second isn’t: The police have said that Michael Brown had no criminal record.)

If anything, the people here were disdainful and, mostly, scared—of the protesters, and, implicitly, of black people.

"I don’t think it’s about justice for Michael Brown’s family," said the teenage boy. "It’s just an excuse for people to do whatever they want to do."

One man I talked to, a stay-at-home dad who is a landlord to three black tenants and one white one in Ferguson (“my black tenants would never do that,” he clarified) was more sympathetic to Brown and also had the sense that the police had overdone it a bit. But he was scared of the protests. I told him that the protest that day was entirely peaceful, festive almost. “You know,” he said. “I have a wife and three children, and if something were to happen to me, that would be very bad.”

As for the protests, well, they weren’t about justice; they were just an excuse. “People are just taking the opportunity to satisfy their desire for junk,” said one woman, knowingly. As if black people, the lust for theft encoded in their DNA, are just barely kept in line by authority.

"When they kill each other, we never hear about it," one of the Starbucks women said. This, she meant, was a good thing. "When it’s black-on-black violence, we never hear about it."

I asked why she thought that was.

"Because, basically, they hate whites!" her friend chimed in. "Prejudice, reverse prejudice. Prejudice goes both ways."

The others signalled their agreement.

"It’s not Ferguson people. It’s a lot of outside people coming in."

This was a sore subject with several of the people I spoke to. A major problem with the protests—and they very clearly did not mean the militarized police response to the protests—was that they were tarnishing St. Louis’s image as a nice place.

"I’m embarrassed to say I’m from St. Louis," the "bullshit" woman grumbled.

"Me, too," said her friend. "I don’t tell people I’m from St. Louis anymore."

"This is not representative of St. Louis," said one of the older women, back at Starbucks. "St. Louis is a good place. And Ferguson is a very good place."

"We have never had anything like this in St. Louis!" her friend exclaimed, flustered, as if trying to clear the city’s good name. "Ever!"

As the women grew uncomfortable, one of them hit on a way to fight back.

"Where are you from?" she asked me.

"Washington," I said.

"Well," she said, satisfied. "You people have trouble too sometimes."

And they all laughed.

Source: http://www.newrepublic.com/article/119102/what-white-st-louis-thinks-about-ferguson

And White St. Louisans wanna be mad when folks think they’re racist shit stains.

coketalk:

nickdouglas:

My friend Thomas Leveritt is enjoying well-earned wild success for his video, “How the sun sees you,” which shows what your face looks like under UV light—and then with sunscreen.

This is fascinating. The quality of the portraiture produced with a UV camera is mesmerizing and quite beautiful. I would love to see someone rig up a UV camera to an interrotron and conduct deeply personal interviews with this effect. The results would be utterly riveting.

the-goddamazon:

janemba:

soujaboymeetsworld:

jackanthonyfernandez:

thechanelmuse:

Meet Cory Nieves. He’s a dapper, 10-year old CEO of Mr. Cory’s Cookies who started his own booming cookie business in an effort to help his mom buy a car after moving from NYC to New Jersey in 2009.

!!!!!! COOKIE CEO !!!!!!!

this is the best post on tumblr ever!!!

What the fuck

Bruh.

Mila gives up for the day

So now a second different drunk man joined the first and as he sat down in the third and final chair the first drunk mumbles something about me to him. I didn’t catch it but in the way you know people are talking about you he did. So he looks like he will not move and to be honest this fight isn’t worth it. I’m going back to the hotel room for now.

Turns out the second dude just came for a chat but how was I supposed to know… Looked like he was gonna join him and they were gonna go through pint after pint and start harassing me…

I just wish I had the resolve to say no when the first old man asked me if he could sit there…. Like I didn’t want him to sit there why did I say yes?? Even though it was a passive yes… No more passive yes. Have to get the hang of the Active no

Drunk 9 am sexists

So they are back. Just stood there talking … Ignoring Me and me absolutely reasonable request.

These are the pints of two men who just decided to sit on that little space I’d been sitting in for like 30 minutes already. Mind you its about 9 am and the pub currently serving breakfast is pretty much empty. First one of them approached and asked me of he could sit in the corner. I saw him with his pint and bleary eyes and thought OK… Uhm I guess so? And then his friend comes a minute later and they start chatting. I just want to quietly read my book and also feel uncomfortable like why do they have to stand/sit there? So I say: would you mind? I am trying to read? And they have a go at me: “how rude, blah blah” so I reply with the obvious answer that the restaurant is empty they could sit anywhere and the bloke lies and says “we were here first anyway!” (Yeah from last night) and I reply with “since when? I was here first!” To that one of them mutters ” let’s go for a fag, these females always….”

These are the pints of two men who just decided to sit on that little space I’d been sitting in for like 30 minutes already. Mind you its about 9 am and the pub currently serving breakfast is pretty much empty. First one of them approached and asked me of he could sit in the corner. I saw him with his pint and bleary eyes and thought OK… Uhm I guess so? And then his friend comes a minute later and they start chatting. I just want to quietly read my book and also feel uncomfortable like why do they have to stand/sit there? So I say: would you mind? I am trying to read? And they have a go at me: “how rude, blah blah” so I reply with the obvious answer that the restaurant is empty they could sit anywhere and the bloke lies and says “we were here first anyway!” (Yeah from last night) and I reply with “since when? I was here first!” To that one of them mutters ” let’s go for a fag, these females always….”

Just got my eyebrows done for the first time and when I finally opened my eyes a waterfall of tears spilled all over my face.