sometimes

cosmictuesdays:


nadiacreek:

coelasquid:

deformutilated:

Fudge recipe on a headstone

I feel like I should make this just to be able to say a dead person taught me how to make it. Maybe I’ll do it for Halloween.

I desperately hope that she spent her entire life telling people that they could have her fudge recipe “over my dead body.”

That last comment is absolutely worth reblogging.

cosmictuesdays:

nadiacreek:

coelasquid:

deformutilated:

Fudge recipe on a headstone

I feel like I should make this just to be able to say a dead person taught me how to make it. Maybe I’ll do it for Halloween.

I desperately hope that she spent her entire life telling people that they could have her fudge recipe “over my dead body.”

That last comment is absolutely worth reblogging.

(via jadelyn)

necrotelecomnicon:

carcharocles:

Scarlett Johansson is a Zionist and supports Israel

stop reblogging pictures of her genocide-loving face

also is the current PR face of an Israeli corporation with factories built on illegally occupied Palestinian land and tapping Palestinian water reserves in order to bottle and sell them

so not just a Zionist, she also directly profits off the continuation of Palestinian oppression

(via marfmellow)

Anonymous asked: What books would you recommend for a beginner who wants to "get conscious"?

themaroonvillage:

Gladly…
They Came Before Columbus by Dr. Ivan Van Sertima

The Blueprint For Black Power by Dr. Amos Wilson

Christopher Columbus and the Afrikan Holocaust: The Rise of European Capitalism by Dr. John Henrik Clarke

The Miseducation of the Negro by Dr. Carter G. Woodson

Precolonial Black Africa by Cheikh Anta Diop

Black Skin White Mask by Frantz Fanon

Assata by Assata Shakur

Soledad Brothers by George Jackson

The Philosophies and Teachings of Marcus Garvey

The Autobiography of Malcolm X by Alex Haley

Yurugu by Dr. Marimba Ani

So much more…but remember, Buy from Black-Owned Bookstores such as these:
African American Books, African American Novels, African American Authors

raideo:

spookyelric:

sphynx-prince:

yungcoochie:

bankston:

goodreasonnews:

amazingatheist:

I’m so glad to see the younger generation waking up to this hypocrisy. 

The homeowner at 22 one is killing me.

…………………….

This meme makes me so angry because it’s so on-target.

I am screaming

this isn’t even funny to me it just makes me want to find the nearest baby boomer and deck them in the mouth

I reblog this every time because it always re-ignites my anger.

I feel you sphynx-prince.  

(Source: seriouslyamerica, via moniquill)


Jenny Holzer, My arrogance knows no bounds and I will make no peace today, and you should be so lucky to find a woman like me 

Jenny Holzer, My arrogance knows no bounds and I will make no peace today, and you should be so lucky to find a woman like me 

(Source: bible-jpg, via marfmellow)

unconsumption:

Here’s a fascinating — if not exactly uplifting — look at the economics, business, and design strategies that led to our throwaway culture came about: Modern Waste is an Economic Strategy « Discard Studies:

About one third of MSW [municipal solid waste] —food scraps, and to a debatable extent, yard trimmings—are present in pre-modern waste.
The rest of modern MSW are disposables: paper, plastics, aluminum, textiles, and packaging.[i] In 1956, Lloyd Stouffer, editor of Modern Packaging Inc., famously (and controversially at the time) declared: “The future of plastics is in the trash can” (Stouffer 1963: 1).
Stouffer’s idea addressed an emerging problem for industry. Products tended to be durable, easy to fix, and limited in variation (such as color or style). With this mode of design, markets were quickly saturating (Packard 1960; Cohen 2003). Opportunities for growth, and thus profit, were rapidly diminishing, particularly after America’s Great Depression and the two World Wars, where an ethos of preservation, reuse, and frugality was cultivated.
In response, industry intervened on a material level and developed disposability through planned obsolescence, single-use items, cheap materials, throw-away packaging, fashion, and conspicuous consumption. These changes were supported by a regimen of advertising that telegraphed industrial principals of value into the social realm, suggesting the difference between durable and disposable, esteemed and taboo.
American industry designed a shift in values that circulated goods through, rather than into, the consumer realm. The truism that humans are inherently wasteful came into being at a particular time and place, by design. 

There’s a ton of great info in this piece, it really is a good read. The over-arching point is that the shifts are so massive that we can’t solve them via individual behavior-change (recycling, etc.) alone; we need policy-level solutions.
I half-agree: Yes, we need policy-level solutions, but we’re more likely to get there by way of individual-level action, behavior change, and engagement. Which is what this site encourages.

unconsumption:

Here’s a fascinating — if not exactly uplifting — look at the economics, business, and design strategies that led to our throwaway culture came about: Modern Waste is an Economic Strategy « Discard Studies:

About one third of MSW [municipal solid waste] —food scraps, and to a debatable extent, yard trimmings—are present in pre-modern waste.

The rest of modern MSW are disposables: paper, plastics, aluminum, textiles, and packaging.[i] In 1956, Lloyd Stouffer, editor of Modern Packaging Inc., famously (and controversially at the time) declared: “The future of plastics is in the trash can” (Stouffer 1963: 1).

Stouffer’s idea addressed an emerging problem for industry. Products tended to be durable, easy to fix, and limited in variation (such as color or style). With this mode of design, markets were quickly saturating (Packard 1960; Cohen 2003). Opportunities for growth, and thus profit, were rapidly diminishing, particularly after America’s Great Depression and the two World Wars, where an ethos of preservation, reuse, and frugality was cultivated.

In response, industry intervened on a material level and developed disposability through planned obsolescence, single-use items, cheap materials, throw-away packaging, fashion, and conspicuous consumption. These changes were supported by a regimen of advertising that telegraphed industrial principals of value into the social realm, suggesting the difference between durable and disposable, esteemed and taboo.

American industry designed a shift in values that circulated goods through, rather than into, the consumer realm. The truism that humans are inherently wasteful came into being at a particular time and place, by design.

There’s a ton of great info in this piece, it really is a good read. The over-arching point is that the shifts are so massive that we can’t solve them via individual behavior-change (recycling, etc.) alone; we need policy-level solutions.

I half-agree: Yes, we need policy-level solutions, but we’re more likely to get there by way of individual-level action, behavior change, and engagement. Which is what this site encourages.